Tag Archives: Recipes

Celebrate Calendula Flowers

Calendula flowers have a sunny disposition in the garden. Use its golden petals in the kitchen and be sure to keep it well-stocked in the medicine cabinet for an array of medicinal uses, including soothing ointments and astringent tinctures. Since antiquity, calendula flowers, or pot marigold, have been used in infusions for many maladies. Since antiquity, calendula (also known as

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Medicinal and Culinary Uses for the Shy Violet

While violets’ delicate blossoms are a treat only for the observant, the plant has enjoyed a long history of medicinal and culinary use. Leigh Hunt, an English Romantic essayist, and poet is the first known author of the phrase “shrinking violet.” In 1820, he published a passage describing a bit of woodland in The Indicator, a poetry magazine: “There was the

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All About Your Heart; 6 Weight-Friendly Juice Recipes

Juicing has become a popular way to boost energy and lose weight. You may have heard juice cleansing radio ads, seen (or bought) expensive juices in the store, or maybe you’ve even made juice from scratch. But does juicing for weight loss work? Juicing refers to using a juicer or blender to liquefy fruits, vegetables, and herbs. Juices differ from

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September Herb of the Month; Annatto

Annatto, Bixa Orellana • An orange-red dye or colorant, flavoring for food and healing agent derived from the seeds of the achiote tree, an evergreen native to tropic and subtropic zones of the Americas • Spiny red fruits contain the seeds and the reddish pericarp that surround the seed contains the annatto or color • Foods colored with the annatto

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Our Pantry Profile: Rosemary

Rosemary {Rosmarinus officinalis} The name Rosmarinus loosely translates to “dew of the sea,” given to rosemary because of its affinity for the wind-swept cliffs of the Mediterranean coast, where it originates. Beloved for centuries for its aroma and health benefits, this strongly aromatic member of the mint family is now cultivated worldwide. Greek scholars wore garlands of rosemary to improve

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The Ultimate Sun and Plant Connection; Summer Sun Tea

Connecting sun, plants and water is one of the easiest ways to bring herbalism into your life during the summer months. As plant lovers, we spend time every day during the seasons connecting personally with the foods & plants in our gardens, and the wild spaces around our homes. But no matter where you are, and your level of training

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Getting to Know Lyre-Leaf Sage

Having fallen into disuse, this North American species is making a comeback thanks to some notable herbalists and a nod from the Herb Society of America. Graceful, light-blue wildflowers border the roads and cover swaths of meadows in periwinkle, from the Mid-Atlantic to Missouri and from Florida to Texas. Known as “just a roadside weed” or invasive species, lyre-leaf sage

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Southwest Gardening: Sacred Mesquite ~Recipes

Mesquite grows well in desert areas from the southwestern United States to the Andean regions of South America. Traditionally, native peoples of the Southwest depended on mesquite. It provided food, fuel, shelter, weapons, medicine, and cosmetics. As times changed, and as refined sugar and wheat flour became staples, the role of mesquite was diminished. Mesquite meal was once made by

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The Power of Pungent Herbs

Energetically warming herbs and spices can help us spark a little fire in the body by improving digestion, boosting circulation, moving out congestion, and more. Not only that, they’re readily available in our pantries, lending themselves to some tasty medicine. When it comes to herbal flavors and actions, many of our most potent and memorable herbs are “pungent.” Think of those

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