Best Practices SOP to Prevent Resale of ‘Irreparably Defective Articles’ for Industry and Public Comment

Botanical Adulterants Prevention Program invites broad herb and dietary supplement industry stakeholder input AUSTIN, Texas (October 10, 2018) — The ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Prevention Program (BAPP) has issued its draft “Best Practices Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for the Disposal/Destruction of Irreparably Defective Articles.” The document, which is intended for members of the herb, dietary supplement, food, and … Continue reading Best Practices SOP to Prevent Resale of ‘Irreparably Defective Articles’ for Industry and Public Comment

Making Sense of Medicinal Plant Research

Anyone who claims that "there's no scientific evidence to support herbal medicine" clearly hasn't been paying attention. Scientists have conducted hundreds of thousands of scientific studies on medicinal botanicals, and this data complements our long tradition {several millennia} of using plants safely as medicine. But to the general public and budding herbalists, this research seems … Continue reading Making Sense of Medicinal Plant Research

Promising Plants for 2018

Herb Society of America: https://crookedbearcreekorganicherbs.files.wordpress.com/2018/06/pp-2018-fact-sheets.pdf Conservation and sustainable gardening Conserving the biodiversity and health of native plants and ecosystems is essential to a healthy planet.  We have a growing understanding of the complexities of ecosystems, in which each plant, the soil, insect, bird and animal life, invertebrates and other organisms, water, air, temperature, and elevation … Continue reading Promising Plants for 2018

Turmeric Adulteration Bulletin Published by ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Prevention Program

Bulletin focuses on adulteration of turmeric with related species, artificial colorants, and the addition of synthetic curcuminoids to turmeric extracts AUSTIN, Texas (June 4, 2018) — The ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Prevention Program (BAPP) has released a Botanical Adulterants Bulletin on turmeric (Curcuma longa) rhizome and its extracts. Few herbal dietary supplement ingredients have seen such a steep … Continue reading Turmeric Adulteration Bulletin Published by ABC-AHP-NCNPR Botanical Adulterants Prevention Program

What Is Borututu Bark?

Deep in the jungles of Africa, the bark of the borututu tree (Cochlospermum angolensis) holds many treasures. A tea made from this interesting substance has traditionally been used to manage ailments related to liver function, indigestion, and fatigue. Indeed, borututu bark tea as a broad spectrum tonic is an old-world tradition. A natural and powerful … Continue reading What Is Borututu Bark?

The Venus Flytrap: Conserving the Carnivorous Curiosity

In his book Insectivorous Plants, which was first published in 1875, English naturalist and evolutionary biologist Charles Darwin wrote that the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula, Droseraceae) “is one of the most wonderful [plants] in the world.”1 Now, that “wonderful” plant is being threatened in the wild by a combination of poaching, overharvesting, habitat loss, fire suppression, … Continue reading The Venus Flytrap: Conserving the Carnivorous Curiosity

Plant Profile: Yerba Mansa

Anemopsis californica Also, Known As: Lizard's Tail Queue de Lézard Swamp Root Yerba Mansa Yerba Manza Usually, the yerba mansa, scientific name Anemopsis californica, is depicted as a perennially growing herb. Native to the United States, this herb grows most actively during the spring and summer. The foliage of this plant is green and it … Continue reading Plant Profile: Yerba Mansa

HOW PLANTS ACQUIRE THEIR ENERGY

Plants must get food into their systems in order to acquire energy and continue living, similar to animals. Plants create energy for animals to use, so they must replenish their nutrients. And plants breathe, in a way. They take in the carbon dioxide that all the animals give off, and they give off oxygen for … Continue reading HOW PLANTS ACQUIRE THEIR ENERGY

Food As Medicine: Sorrel

Want to add some lemony tang to your dish and receive essential vitamins and minerals at the same time? Garden sorrel can do the trick. All things in moderation, though. Oxalic acid contained in sorrel can lead to the formation of kidney stones if consumed in excess. History and Traditional Use Range and Habitat Garden … Continue reading Food As Medicine: Sorrel

Review on Sustainable Use of Medicinal Plants

Chen S-L, Yu H, Luo H-M, Wu Q, Li C-F, Steinmetz A. Conservation and sustainable use of medicinal plants: problems, progress, and prospects. Chin Med. July 30, 2016;11:37. doi: 10.1186/s13020-016-0108-7. Over 1300 medicinal plants are used in Europe, with 90% harvested from the wild. In the United States, about 118 of the top 150 prescription … Continue reading Review on Sustainable Use of Medicinal Plants