Tag Archives: Apiaceae

Clinical Efficacy of Fennel Cream for Improved Sexual Function in Postmenopausal Women

Sexual dysfunction is a common complication of menopause. Estrogen therapy, administered orally or vaginally, can reduce symptoms of vaginal atrophy and improve sexual function in postmenopausal women. However, estrogen therapy can be associated with serious side effects and may not be appropriate for some women. Effective alternative non-hormonal options are needed for postmenopausal women with sexual dysfunction. Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare,

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Coriander, Rose, and Violet Combination May Reduce the Frequency, Duration, and Severity of Migraines

A migraine headache is among the most disabling inflictions globally, in part, because it adversely affects quality-of-life. Some pharmaceuticals are used prophylactically to decrease migraine frequency and severity, but they have unwanted side effects. In traditional Iranian medicine, coriander (Coriandrum sativum, Apiaceae) fruit, rose (Rosa damascena, Rosaceae) flower, and violet (Viola odorata, Violaceae) flower are used to treat headache. According

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Consumption of Garlic, Coriander, and a Combination of the Two Improved the Lipid Profiles of Patients with Hyperlipidemia

Hyperlipidemia is a major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The retention of lipid-containing compounds such as low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in coronary arteries results in decreased blood flow to the heart. High-energy diets low in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids and the lack of physical activities have attributed to an increase in CVD. Nutraceuticals such as garlic (Allium sativum, Amaryllidaceae) and

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Food as Medicine Update: Carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus, Apiaceae)

Widely available at most supermarkets, the common root vegetable carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus, Apiaceae) is a biennial plant with erect, green stems and fine, feathery leaves.1 The plant produces densely clustered white blossoms in an umbrella shape, which is typical of plants in the Apiaceae family. The edible taproot comes in a variety of colors: orange is the most widely available in

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Food as Medicine: Anise (Pimpinella anisum, Apiaceae)

Anise or aniseed (Pimpinella anisum, Apiaceae) is an herbaceous annual that grows to almost a meter (3.3 feet) in height.1,2 The lower leaves of the plant are dark green, heart-shaped, and shallowly lobed, while the upper leaves are feathery. In the summer, the plant produces small, white flowers in an umbrella-shaped head, and, in the fall, these flowers produce aromatic fruits that are three to

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Anise Seed Associated with Improved Quality of Life in Patients with Postprandial Distress Syndrome

Functional dyspepsia (FD) is characterized by early satiety, uncomfortable fullness after eating (postprandial fullness) and moderate to a severe epigastric pain that persists for 12 or more weeks. These symptoms can limit work capacity, generate anxiety, and diminish the overall quality of life (QOL). Medical treatments are limited, with unpleasant side effects, and herbal medicines offer alternative treatment options. In

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Fluid Containing Hyaluronic Acid, Gotu Kola Extract, and Glycerin Improves Skin Hydration and Skin Barrier Function in Healthy Women

Skin hydration is essential for maintaining healthy skin. Some skin moisturizers used both cosmetically and for skin disease, can negatively affect skin barrier function because they contain ingredients that are harmful to the skin. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is an anionic, nonsulfated glycosaminoglycan found in connective, epithelial, and neural tissue. The hydrating effects of HA and glycerin have been well documented,

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Food as Medicine: Anise (Pimpinella anisum, Apiaceae)

Anise or aniseed (Pimpinella anisum, Apiaceae) is a herbaceous annual that grows to almost a meter (3.3 feet) in height. The lower leaves of the plant are dark green, heart-shaped, and shallowly lobed, while the upper leaves are feathery. In the summer, the plant produces small, white flowers in an umbrella-shaped head, and, in the fall, these flowers produce aromatic fruits

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Food as Medicine: Cumin (Cuminum cyminum, Apiaceae)

History and Traditional Use Cumin (Cuminum cyminum, Apiaceae) is a delicate, herbaceous annual in the aromatic parsley family.1,2 It is native to the eastern Mediterranean region and southwestern Asia.1 While Iran and India are the largest global producers and exporters of cumin, it is cultivated in areas of the Middle East, Europe, Asia, and northern Africa as well.1,3 Cumin is

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