Benefits of Aloe Vera Juice

Most people are aware that aloe vera soothes dry skin, sunburn, and other skin irritations, but not many know of the many health benefits the plant offers when it’s consumed. For instance, recent studies have shown that aloe vera helps the immune system, encourages normal blood sugar, and reduces redness and swelling. Best of all it’s natural and totally safe!

More and more products are being created to help people consume aloe vera. One of the most popular is aloe vera juice. The benefits are many, and here are some of the most notable:

  • Aids digestion and even relieves occasional constipation
  • Eases stomach ache and acid
  • Increases alkalization and reduces acidity in the body
  • Soothes redness and swelling
  • Encourages normal stomach lining
  • Supports memory, learning, and overall mood

Surprised? There’s actually more. It’s because aloe vera contains a wealth of nutrients, like vitamins A, C, E, and B12, as well as minerals like potassium, zinc, and magnesium. It also provides powerful antioxidants, helps to balance metabolism, promotes oral health boosts the immune system and even supports normal circulation and blood pressure. It’s been reported to promote heart health. In another study, aloe encouraged normal blood sugar.

Even though aloe vera juice is ingested, it still contains many nutrients that make it great for your skin! It remains a powerful tool for irritated skin due to burns, minor cuts, and severe dryness. Even when consumed, many of aloe vera’s properties still pass through the body and ultimately aid the skin in the same ways as aloe vera gels and lotions do when they are applied topically. Now, no one is saying that aloe vera is some magic cure-all, but the plant does contain a wealth of nutrients that benefit those who use it.

Why Should You Drink Aloe Vera Juice?

In addition to its many internal health benefits, drinking aloe vera juice is great because it enables you to ingest the plant’s nutrients without dealing with the unpleasant taste of fresh aloe. It also helps to take the guesswork out of what you should actually consume, as the aloe’s inner and outer leaf properties vary greatly. I should also note that there are over 400 different species of aloe, each with their own chemical composition. If you are looking to consume aloe vera juice or any other product, be sure to verify that you’re looking at things made with aloe vera and not any other species of the plant. There are many products to choose from, so be sure to evaluate them carefully before choosing one to take. Of course, if none of the juices you find quite meet your taste, you do always have the option of making your own.

How to Make Your Own Aloe Vera Juice

It’s not hard to make your own aloe vera juice, but before you start, here are a few points to consider. First, you should only use organic aloe vera leaves and make absolutely sure to find a plant marked as “edible”. You can either buy leaves that are already cut or grow your own full plant. Assuming you are using a whole aloe vera plant, you’ll remove the leaf or leaves you’d like to use from the plant. As long as you’re careful, you won’t harm your aloe. After all, this is a resilient species that has a natural ability to heal itself.

If you are removing the leaves from a plant, you absolutely must use a sharp knife. You want to leave a clean cut so that the plant heals swiftly. Begin by cutting the leaf off near the base of the plant. Focus on removing the desirable inner leaf gel. This will need to be done whether you’ve purchased individual aloe leaves or you have a whole plant. Start by splitting your leaf in half lengthwise. This will reveal the juices inside the leaf. Next, scoop out the gel (and only the gel)! Be sure to avoid the firm yellow areas, as this is what we consider the outer leaf. Remember, this does contain different properties and is not the desirable substance you’re after for your juice.

**Tip: Try to limit damage to the outer leaf or rind, as this could enable compounds like aloin or aloe latex to seep into your inner leaf gel.

Once you’ve separated the inner leaf gel, place it into a blender. Add fresh lemon, lime, orange juice or any other citrus flavor to meet your taste. This is a great opportunity to add more organic fruit to your diet. Before you blend, make sure you have about equal amounts of your aloe vera gel and your citrus component. I recommend 2-3 tablespoons of each.

After you’ve blended your original mixture, add it to a cup of cold water. If you find the taste to be too strong, feel free to add more water to dilute. You might also consider adding a splash of apple cider vinegar to help add even more nutrients and a bit more zip to the taste.

Risks of Consuming Aloe Vera Juice

Even though aloe vera does offer many health benefits, you don’t want to get too carried away with taking it. Everything in moderation, right? For one, aloe vera leaves contain a compound called aloin. Aloin can induce a harsh laxative effect. And when taken too frequently, some compounds in aloe vera can create an electrolyte imbalance.

Other Ways to Enjoy Aloe Vera’s Health Benefits

If aloe vera juice is not for you, you can still enjoy its many health benefits. Today, you can get aloe vera dietary supplements in capsule form. But remember to check out the ingredients before you take anything! Not all aloe vera supplements are created equally. They do not contain the same amount of nutrients proteins, and plant compounds so each can have a very specific effect on your body. Evaluate the ingredients and use this information to help you choose the supplement best suited to give you the benefits you seek. For the maximum health benefit, look for supplements that feature acemannan, a potent plant chemical found in the inner aloe vera leaf.

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Guide to Growing Your Own Aloe Vera

The aloe vera plant has become incredibly popular. It’s a very easy plant to care for, making it a staple in many homes. A large part of aloe vera’s popularity can be attributed to the fact that it boasts a wide range of natural health properties. These versatile plants are known for their ability to thrive under virtually any conditions, as they grow equally well indoors and outdoors with minimal care. Scientifically named aloe barbadensis miller, it’s one of the best plants for someone who is new to gardening or interested in growing their own super foods!

Today, I’ll walk through what you need to know about growing your own aloe vera. We will also share some of the things you should watch out for as you care for your plant. No matter how small the plant may be when you first bring your aloe vera home, there is a lot to look forward to. The plant is well known for its quick leaf multiplication and for mothering plantlets known as ‘babies’ that can be removed to yield entirely new plants. This means that once your plant reaches maturity, you will be able to harvest aloe vera leaves continuously.

Traditionally, aloe is known for its topical benefits, including wound healing and keeping the skin moisturized and protected. It’s been used in numerous beauty products as an additive for its vitamin and acemannan content; however, its nutritional properties also make this plant a living superfood. Now let’s learn how to grow your own!

Growing Your Own Aloe Vera

When you first get started with growing your own aloe vera, the most important things to consider are the soil and location of the plant. First, decide where you will be growing your aloe vera. Whether indoors or outdoors, it is imperative that you choose a place where your plant will receive plenty of light. This can be a little tricky, though, because too much direct sunlight can cause the plant to dry out and turn the leaves brown – but too little light will stunt the plant’s growth. It is also important to note that aloe can freeze in the winter if outside, so keep your local climate in mind when choosing where you want to place your plant. I recommend choosing a pot you can easily bring indoors during freezes or leaving your plant in a location you can cover with a tarp or blanket. If the plant is to be grown indoors, make sure the plant will receive enough indirect sunlight; south or west-facing windows are ideal.

Once you’ve decided where your aloe vera is going to live, it’s time to begin thinking about the soil. Aloe vera likes dry soil, so I recommend using cactus potting soil mix. The best alternative would be to use a regular potting soil with perlite added. When planting your aloe vera, make sure to position the plant so it is upright, and cover the base and roots with the soil. Provide several inches of space between plants, as they do grow outward from the center. Give your aloe vera a bit of space because the mother plant will offset the “babies” from the outer base.

It’s also important to choose an appropriate planter. Start with a medium to the large planter and make sure it has good drainage. Planters with a single large hole in the bottom are best, as your plant will not grow if there is standing water. In fact, one of the most common issues new plant owners run into when trying to care for aloe vera is that they overwater the plant. When watering, the soil should feel damp but not soaked. The best way to gauge watering is to feel the plant leaves every few days, as long as they feel cool or moist, the plant has enough water. If the leaves feel dry or brittle, first examine the sunlight conditions, then adjust water as needed. Before you water again, the soil should be completely dry. During cooler months, it will need less water.

Harvesting Leaves from Your Aloe Vera Plant

Aloe Vera

Once your plant reaches maturity, you can begin to harvest aloe for its nutritional benefits. It’s safe to begin this process once additional leaves or shoots have grown from the center of the plant. To harvest leaves from your aloe vera, start by selecting mature leaves from the outermost section of the plant. Cut them from as close to the base as possible, but be mindful not to disturb the roots. Because it’s a living decoration, I would suggest selecting plant leaves that will not reduce the plant’s aesthetics.

The plantlets or “babies” your aloe produces can easily be removed by carefully uprooting them, detaching from the parent, and re-planting on their own. These mini plants make great gifts. It’s not uncommon for aloe plants to repopulate exponentially, so there’s a good chance that you will have plenty of aloes before you know it!

Additional Considerations for Your Aloe Plant

Caring for your aloe vera plant is not difficult. There are, however, a few considerations to keep in mind:

  • Aloe does not need to be fertilized. If you want to, or think it needs a little extra food, use a phosphorus-heavy, water-based fertilizer at half-strength.
  • If the leaves become thin and curled, it needs more water.
  • Aloe vera leaves grow upward from the base. If the leaves droop or lie flat, it probably needs more sunlight.
  • Your plant will grow towards the sun, if in a pot, rotate as needed to keep the plant leaves upright.

If your aloe grows slowly, here are a few common issues to check:

  • The soil is too alkaline. This can be corrected by adding a bit of soil sulfur.
  • The plant has too much water, the soil is too damp, or it holds too much water. This can be corrected by modifying the amount of water added to the plant.
  • It needs more sunlight. This can be remedied with a simple change of scenery.
  • It has too much fertilizer. In this scenario, you can simply repot the plant with more soil.
  • The plant needs a bigger pot for its roots. Eventually, all healthy aloe vera plants will probably reach this point.

Things to Watch Out For

Like any plant, aloe vera can suffer from bugs, disease, and fungus on its stem or roots. Mealybugs and scale, which are small, flat tan or brown bugs that suck the sap from aloe, are the most common insect problems. You should also be mindful of leaf rot, as this is a common ailment for aloe.

To avoid fungus, keep the soil and plant dry. You can protect your aloe vera plant from pests with a natural pesticide. Look for an organic pesticide instead of one that is toxic. You can even make your own safe, organic pesticide at home. Fortunately, because of aloe vera’s ideal growing conditions, the fungus is not a common problem.

Be sure to protect yourself too. Young aloe vera plants have soft spikes on their leaves that won’t do much damage but the spikes of older, more established plants can prick you good if you’re not careful. These spikes are capable of tearing clothes and even puncturing the skin. Be mindful when repotting or harvesting and wear gloves when handling.

Getting Something in Return from Your Aloe Vera Plant

Aloe Vera

The aloe vera plant isn’t all about looking good and adding beauty to your home. Many people enjoy the many uses of the aloe vera plant. One of the most common is using aloe vera’s inner leaf gel as a topical remedy for burns and sunburns, cuts, and other skin irritations. This inner-leaf gel can also be consumed for collagen support, as a digestive aid, its immune supporting properties, and many other superfood benefits.

Supplementing Your Diet with Aloe Vera

To get the most out of your aloe vera plant, properly caring for your plant and harvesting the leaves the right way are crucial. And, it should be noted that inner leaf gel can be stored in the refrigerator for a day or two, however, it is not the best on-the-go food. Some people find the taste to be slightly bitter so it’s often consumed in smoothies. Just be careful to avoid the outer leaf because it contains aloin, which can act as a harsh laxative. The aloin, taste, and short storage life make aloe supplementation a great alternative to consuming raw aloe.

Aloe has been used around the world for centuries as nutritional supplementation and topical use. It’s a natural source of vitamins, minerals, trace elements, and enzymes; all of which support healthy immune function, soothe and cleanse the digestive tract, and support the circulatory system.

Properties of Aloe Plant Leaves

Around the world, aloe plants – especially aloe vera – have many traditional uses and plays an important role in many cultures. You’ve probably seen it used in skin care lotions and recommended for conditions like sunburn, eczema, and rosacea. And many people even like to grow aloe vera or other aloe species in their own homes. Aloe plants tend to be very durable and can thrive in just about any environment. This also lends to their popularity as a houseplant.

The properties of these plants also make them very versatile. When ingested, they are incredibly soothing, loaded with antioxidants, and offer countless other health benefits. Of course, the various species of aloe will be comprised of different compounds and properties. Even the inner and outer parts of aloe leaves contain different properties. Today, we’ll take a deeper look at the properties of both inner and outer aloe leaves.

How Do Properties Vary Between Species of Aloe?

There are over 400 different species of aloe plants, but these do share similar qualities. The biggest difference between most of them is typically the amount and density of minerals, vitamins, and nutrients. Aloe vera, of course, stands out among the crowd because its use to promote health has become so commonplace. The reason for this? Aloe vera boasts the highest levels of acemannan, a powerful polysaccharide that has many health benefits of its own. Since aloe vera is the most familiar of aloe plant species, let’s start by using this as our point of reference.

Getting Familiar with the Aloe Vera Plant

The aloe vera plant has long slender leaves with a moist, gel-like skin that extend from a single base. Sharp pointy spikes dot the edges of the leaves and in larger, more mature aloe plants, these can become stiff enough to pierce human skin. Given a chance, the aloe vera plant can grow to over four feet tall, but if kept in a small pot, it will survive perfectly well on a windowsill, table, or desk.

This member of the succulent family is often mistaken for a cactus because of the way it holds water. In fact, a healthy aloe vera plant contains about 95% water. The inner leaf holds most of the nutrients, making it the most desirable part of the plant. When well hydrated, you can remove the entire inner leaf from the harder, smooth outer leaf as a single solid gel, kind of like jello.

Beneficial Properties Within the Aloe Vera Inner Leaf

As we mentioned above, the most studied and well-documented property of the inner aloe vera leaf is the polysaccharide, acemannan. Acemannan is great because it can be used both externally to soothe the skin) and internally for nutritional benefits. Researchers report aloe vera has these additional benefits, among others:

  • Supports good dental health
  • Supports a normal immune response
  • Soothes redness and swelling

As I mentioned earlier, there’s a wide variety of aloe plants and each has varying amounts of acemannan. Today, if you see aloe or aloe products in stores, you’re probably encountering aloe vera. Of course, you’ll always want to double check not only the species of aloe a product is made from, but also the contents of the product before you ever considering using it – especially if you are planning to ingest it.

For any aloe you plan on orally consuming, always makes sure to use only organic inner aloe vera leaf products. You may come across some products made from “outer leaf” or “whole leaf” aloe vera components. Run! These would contain both aloin and aloe latex, which behaves like an ultra-harsh laxative. In addition the laxative properties, these products would also have a far inferior nutrient density when it comes to key nutrients like acemannan – if it contains any at all!

Watch Out for Outer Aloe Vera Leaf

While you want to avoid ingesting the outer leaf area, it does offer some benefits. For instance, the gel of the firm outer leaf contains aloe-emodin, a plant chemical shown in studies with mice to support immune system health.

Frankly, however, aloin gets most of the attention when it comes to the outer leaf. In 2002, the Food and Drug Administration actually banned aloin from all OTC laxatives in the U.S. Between aloin and the aloe latex, it’s important to understand the different properties found in the skin, gel, latex, and inner leaf of the aloe vera plant. I can’t stress enough the importance of avoiding any type of oral consumption of aloin or aloe latex.

Aloe vera gel from the outer leave is perfectly safe for mild skin irritations, like sunburn. Just remember, outer leaf aloe should never be used on open or deep wounds. It’s also worth mentioning that when used topically, outer leaf aloe can cause an allergic reaction in some people. This usually takes the form of a mild rash, but if one does develop, it’s important to cease use immediately.

How to Evaluate Aloe Products

When choosing any aloe vera supplement, always look at the levels of active components like aloin, aloe-emodin, and acemannan. Assuming you already know exactly what you want from your aloe product, reviewing the ingredients of your product can help you to determine how effective different aloe products will be. This goes a long way in helping you to make the right decision about what you should or shouldn’t consider taking.

True Aloe

Aloe Vera

Latin Name

L. Aloe vera, Aloe barbadensis var miller, Aloe vera var. chinensis, Aloe vulgaris, Aloe vera var. lanzae, Aloe indica, Aloe barbadensis var. chinensis, Aloe vera var. wratislaviensis, Aloe elongata, Aloe vera var. littoralis, Aloe perfoliata var. vera, Aloe perfoliata var. barbadensis, Aloe flava, Aloe chinensis, Aloe barbadensis, Aloe lanzae.

Common Names

Aloe vera, True Aloe

Suggested Properties

Anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anti-viral and energy tonic

Indicated for

Digestive tract irritations such as colitis, ulcers and irritable bowel syndrome, cleansing stomach, liver, kidneys, spleen, bladder and colon, arthritis, asthma, bladder and kidney infections, cancer, constipation, diverticular disorders, haemorrhoids, heartburn, heart disease, HIV, immune stimulation, indigestion, insomnia, kidney disease, leg cramps, leukemia, skin health, stomach distress, tumours, vaginitis, vaginal douche, viruses, white blood cell production and general health tonic.

If you are using oral corticosteroids, such as beclomethasone, methylprednisolone, or prednisone, it is important not to overuse or misuse Aloe vera juice. A potassium deficiency can develop, and you may experience toxic effects from the medication.

Although it is removed, in practice Aloe vera juice may sometimes still contain tiny quantities of the laxative compound found in aloe latex. Should you begin to have cramps or diarrhea do not ingest any more of the juice.

Allergies to aloe vera are very rare. Yet any food can be a potential allergen. Test a small amount on the inner arm to see if any reaction takes place. If no irritation on the skin is observed then it is generally tolerated. If ingestion causes diarrhea, then reduce the amount you ingest, increasing use slowly over several days until the desired amount is tolerated.

Surprising Facts About Aloe Vera

  • With a history that extends back 6,000 years, Aloe vera is believed to have originated in the Sudan.
  • Although it resembles a cactus, Aloe is a member of the lily family.
  • There are 400 species of the Aloe vera plant.
  • Aloe’s health benefits are supported by nearly 700 published scientific and clinical studies.
  • Aloe vera offers over 200 biologically active amino acids, vitamins, antioxidants, minerals, and enzymes.
  • Both Ayurvedic medicines in India and Traditional Chinese Medicine utilize Aloe vera.
  • Aloe vera is the second most frequently used ingredient in Hispanic culture and, in Asian culture, is second only to red ginseng.
  • Native Americans called it the “Wand of the Heaven.”

Aloe vera, also known as Aloe barbadensis, has been a staple for thousands of years in many cultures around the world. Today, it’s used in lotions, ointments, creams, sunburn remedies, and cosmetics, among other things. Traditional uses for aloe vera include soothing burns, moisturizing skin, and healing small wounds. Many people even apply it to reduce the appearance of acne. Aloe vera offers a wide range of nutritional benefits that support more than just skin health. Let’s take a look at some other uses you may not know about.

1. Aloe Vera Supports the Immune System

The immune system requires oxygen-rich blood. Aloe vera supports nutrient absorption, a key factor in maintaining blood-oxygen levels. Oddly enough, one of the ways aloe does this is by keeping the digestive tract clean through bowel regularity.

Aloe also acts as an adaptogen, which keeps cells in balance. It helps protect them from stress and other factors that disrupt their function, in turn making it easier for the immune system to do its job.

Aloe vera is an abundant source of polysaccharides. Research shows these complex sugars improve the efficiency of the immune system. Aloe is also rich in the antioxidants that protect against free radicals.

2. Aloe Vera Supports Normal Digestion

Aloe vera contains two enzymes — amylase and lipase — that are helpful for encouraging normal digestion. Aloe also helps keep your stomach acid levels balanced to support a normal gut environment.

Some preliminary research suggests aloe may also help with ulcerative colitis, a condition in which ulcers form in the intestines. In a clinical trial, 30 patients suffering from the condition were given aloe vera. Fourteen of the thirty patients reported some form of improvement; only four patients in the placebo group reported improvement.

Aloe contains acemannan. Acemannan and other polysaccharides are prebiotics that supports probiotics in the gut. When you have these ‘good guys’ in your gut, you’re apt to digest your food better, get more nutritional value from it, and just enjoy better health. A University of California, Davis study found people who consumed aloe vera absorbed vitamin C and vitamin B12 better.

3. Helps Relieve Symptoms of IBS?

Irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS, affects many people. Common symptoms include gas, diarrhea, constipation, and abdominal discomfort. Many people have reported experiencing relief after taking aloe supplements.

4. Rich in Vitamins and Minerals

Aloe is loaded with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, including:

  • Vitamin A (beta-carotene): Important for healthy skin, teeth, bones, and eyes.
  • Vitamin C: Vital for energy creation, skin health, and immune function.
  • Vitamin E: Protects the skin from UV damage.
  • Vitamin B12: Keep’s nerve and brain cells healthy. Necessary to replicate DNA.
  • Folic acid: Essential for brain function, liver health, and energy creation.
  • Choline: Supports metabolism and the neurotransmitters needed for memory, focus, and a positive mood.

Aloe contains calcium, chromium, copper, selenium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium, and zinc, all of which are integral to energy creation, hormone balance, cellular reproduction, and immune system function.

5. Aloe Vera is a Great Source of Nutrients and Enzymes

Aloe vera is often called a superfood because, in addition to vitamins and minerals, it offers more than 200 other bioavailable nutrients. It’s especially rich in the following enzymes, which support energy creation, hormone function, digestion, and toxin removal:

  • Alliinase
  • Alkaline phosphatase
  • Amylase
  • Bradykinase
  • Carboxypeptidase
  • Catalase
  • Cellulase
  • Lipase
  • Peroxidase

There is a group of nutrients known as secondary metabolites which are only found in aloe. Some of these include aloe emodin, chrysophanol, aloesin, and aloin. Research shows these nutrients can offer a number of other important health benefits.

6. Aloe Supports Cardiovascular Health

Phytosterols are beneficial compounds in plants and aloe vera is a particularly rich source. Phytosterols help balance LDL cholesterol levels and support cardiovascular health. In a five-year study of 5,000 heart disease patients, researchers found those who consumed aloe vera and another plant called ‘Husk of Isabgol’ had better cholesterol and blood sugar numbers.

7. Aloe Vera Boosts Dental Health

A recent study involving 345 participants suggests aloe makes an effective mouthwash that supports healthy teeth and gums. Another study found that aloe vera gel can help fight Candida albicans, a common mouth fungus.

8. Aloe Fights Harmful Organisms

Some plants contain a variety of chemicals and compounds that serve as antiseptic agents and help combat harmful organisms. Aloe vera itself contains six powerful antiseptic agents the human body is able to use: lupeol, salicylic acid, urea nitrogen, cinnamic acid, phenols, and sulfur.

9. Aloe Vera is Ultra Soothing

One of the best uses for aloe vera is to soothe all types of red, swollen, irritated tissue. It contains an enzyme called bradykinase that helps reduce irritation.

10. Aloe Vera May Have Anti-Aging Properties

It appears aloe vera does more than soothe and moisturize. It also offers anti-aging benefits that clear the appearance of wrinkles from the inside out. In one study, 30 women over the age of 45 took an aloe vera gel supplement for 90 days. By the end of the study, the appearance of their facial wrinkles decreased and their skin looked better.

In Conclusion

Aloe vera does a lot more than soothe a sunburn. It’s good for skin and is a potent superfood that delivers powerful nutrition. There are several ways to harness the benefits of aloe vera. You can take it as a juice, a gel, or in pill form. When choosing an aloe supplement, check the ingredients. Some products include ingredients other than aloe vera and may not contain the nutrients, ingredients, or concentrations you expect, acemannan in particular.

What Is Acemannan?

Acemannan pronounced “ace-man-nan”, is a polysaccharide found in the inner part of aloe vera leaves. It’s actually the component that sets aloe vera apart from the 400+ other species of aloe plants. Acemannan has many nutritional qualities and is largely responsible for the benefits aloe vera offers.

Do All of Aloe Vera’s Health Benefits Come from Acemannan?

Aloe vera offers many health benefits and you’ve probably noticed that there are a lot of aloe vera products on the market. Topical products like lotions and creams take advantage of aloe vera’s unique ability to soothe skin. Aloe vera also offers a wealth of internal benefits. For example, studies have shown that formulas with acemannan outperform other remedies for oral wounds.

There’s a lot of evidence to suggest that, when ingested, aloe vera supports immune health, is very soothing, and even aids digestion. Some research indicates that acemannan can help support normal blood sugar and triglyceride levels. As beneficial as acemannan is, there is a matrix of other vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients working together within the plant.

Best Way to Consume Acemannan

The best way to ensure you’re getting acemannan is to verify that the aloe vera product you’ve chosen is made from the inner aloe vera leaf, not the outer leaf or whole leaf. There are big differences between the inner and outer leaf. For instance, certain compounds within the outer leaf are known to cause severe gastric distress, stay clear!

What about consuming fresh aloe vera straight from the leaf? Certainly doable, but not everyone appreciates the taste, as aloe vera can be bitter and overpowering, even when mixed with juices or smoothies. It’s also difficult to consume the gel from the inner aloe vera leaf without ending up with part of the outer leaf and all that comes with it.

What About Aloe Vera Juice?

Some people prefer aloe vera juice but it can be difficult to find a juice made with only inner leaf aloe vera. Even juices that are made using the gel from the inner aloe vera leaf may still contain other additives.