The Beautiful Herb That’s Amazing for Your Heart; Red Clover Benefits

Finding a three-leaf clover may bring good luck, but taking red clover as a healing herb may bring even better fortune! People have appreciated the therapeutic qualities of the red clover's pink and red-hued blossom for generations. Women, in particular, have passed down its secrets as a remedy for feminine issues, whether premenstrual syndrome or menopause symptoms. … Continue reading The Beautiful Herb That’s Amazing for Your Heart; Red Clover Benefits

Let’s Create Some Herbal Remedies – When Cold and Flu Season Arrives.

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

These two recipes are prepared as teas but are not taken in your tea cup – they help with the discomfort of flu season in other ways.

Winter Inhalation

living-herbs-for-cold-flu-thymeThis traditional herbal steam helps open your sinuses, discourages bacterial and viral growth, and reduces pain and inflammation. Remember to stay a comfortable distance from the steaming pot to avoid burning your face.

8 – 12 teaspoons fresh or 4 teaspoons dried eucalyptus leaf {Eucalyptus globulus}

2 – 3 tablespoons fresh or 1 tablespoon dried peppermint leaf

2 – 3 tablespoons fresh or 1 tablespoon dried thyme herb

3 cups purified water

Essential oils of the herbs above {optional}

Place the eucalyptus, peppermint, thyme, and water in a saucepan and stir to thoroughly combine. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer, covered, for 5 to 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and uncover. Drape a large towel…

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How to Brew Herbal Sun Tea

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

Cool down with delicious, thirst-quenching herbal sun tea. Follow a few simple steps to enjoy a variety of refreshing flavors that are perfect for front porch sipping. Solar tea has never tasted so good.

Fresh organic herbs produce healthier, more refreshing teas, so pick your ingredients straight from the garden or buy from a local grower. All you need to make solar tea is a quart canning jar (good for preserving the herbs’ fragrant oils and properties), water, coarsely cut herbs of choice and sunshine.

To start, toss a half cup to 1 cup of fresh herbs into the canning jar. With practice, adjust this amount to suit your taste and the plants’ nature. Add water, a lid, and a few shakes. Place the jar where it will receive full sunlight, such as on a rooftop, open field or driveway. If possible, give the mixture a couple more shakes throughout…

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Make Mom a Herbal Bouquet

Crooked Bear Creek Organic Herbs

Bring inside the fresh scents of your garden this season. An herbal bouquet is the perfect antidote to stale late-winter air and helps prepare your home for spring. Herbal bouquets make great housewarming gifts or table toppers, and they make any floral arrangement unique.

Suzy Bales, author of Garden Bouquets and Beyond(Rodale, 2010), recommends combining a variety of fragrances and textures in your bouquet. Mint and geranium leaves make good bouquet herbs because they come in a wide array of scents, including chocolate, orange and apple. Herb Companion contributor Mary Fran McQuade likes geraniums because of their varied textures and also suggests including fuzzy lamb’s-ears in your bouquet so passersby will be intrigued to take a closer look and possibly even touch. Instead of baby’s breath or ferns to fill out your bouquet, try green wheat stalks, dill, parsley or fennel to add texture and shape.

Herbal bouquets can…

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Those Medicinal Weeds: Plantain {Plantago major}

Also, Known As: Plantain Ribwort Snakeweed When we talk about plantain, normally the image of a banana plantation conjures up in our mind. But the common plantain is a small wild plant with leaves that grow mostly from the plant's bottom. It is found growing naturally in the lawns, gardens, backyards and along the roads throughout America. The … Continue reading Those Medicinal Weeds: Plantain {Plantago major}

Food as Medicine: Mango (Mangifera indica, Anacardiaceae)

History and Traditional Use Range and Habitat Mangifera indica (Anacardiaceae) is a tropical tree that grows from 33 feet to 131 feet in height and produces large, oval-shaped fruits that are red and gold when ripe, though some cultivars are green or yellow.1 The smooth-edged leaves of the mango tree are reddish when young, becoming dark green … Continue reading Food as Medicine: Mango (Mangifera indica, Anacardiaceae)

Aloe Vera For Hair

Aloe vera is a plant that grows in tropical and sub-tropical areas of the world. People appreciate it for its decorative uses and medicinal properties. People have valued this member of the Liliaceae family for its many healing and regenerative properties for millennia. Advocates of using aloe vera for hair health point to its plentiful supply of vitamins, … Continue reading Aloe Vera For Hair

Supplements could be missing opportunity connected to essential oils, experts say

Herbal product companies may be missing an opportunity in which essential oils and specific dietary supplements could be recommended simultaneously in condition-specific settings, experts say. Source: Supplements could be missing opportunity connected to essential oils, experts say

Food as Medicine: Arugula (Eruca sativa, Brassicaceae)

History and Traditional Use Range and Habitat Arugula (Eruca sativa, Brassicaceae), also known as rucola and rocket, is a weedy annual that is drought-tolerant and prefers a hot, dry climate. The name “arugula” is a modern American designation and likely derives from the Italian term “rucola.” The name “rocket” is more common in British English, as is … Continue reading Food as Medicine: Arugula (Eruca sativa, Brassicaceae)