Uses, Chemistry, and Pharmacology of Lemon Balm

Native to southern Europe, lemon balm is a bushy perennial that can grow to two or three feet tall. Like other members of the mint family, it has square stems and opposite, branching leaves. The flowers, which usually appear from about June to September, are small, inconspicuous, yellow to pinkish-white, and have the “lipped” look … Continue reading Uses, Chemistry, and Pharmacology of Lemon Balm

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Lemon Balm Extract Reported Safe in Providing Beneficial Effects for Glycation-Associated Tissue Damage, Arterial Stiffness, and Skin Elasticity

Lemon Balm (Melissa officinalis, Lamiaceae) Glycation-associated Tissue Damage Arterial Stiffness Skin Elasticity Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are generated by the nonenzymatic glycosylation of proteins, or glycation, and are associated with increased oxidative stress and inflammation. In patients with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, or Alzheimer's disease, the tissue content of AGEs is much higher than in … Continue reading Lemon Balm Extract Reported Safe in Providing Beneficial Effects for Glycation-Associated Tissue Damage, Arterial Stiffness, and Skin Elasticity