Curcumin May Improve Liver Steatosis in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome (METS) is a metabolic disorder characterized by a combination of multiple factors including abdominal obesity, hypertension, hyperglycemia, or dyslipidemia. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an abnormal accumulation of fat in the liver, or steatosis, which can progress to fibrosis and liver dysfunction. NAFLD is the most common cause of chronic liver disease … Continue reading Curcumin May Improve Liver Steatosis in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

Making Sense of Medicinal Plant Research

Anyone who claims that "there's no scientific evidence to support herbal medicine" clearly hasn't been paying attention. Scientists have conducted hundreds of thousands of scientific studies on medicinal botanicals, and this data complements our long tradition {several millennia} of using plants safely as medicine. But to the general public and budding herbalists, this research seems … Continue reading Making Sense of Medicinal Plant Research

Our Pantry Profile: Rosemary

Rosemary {Rosmarinus officinalis} The name Rosmarinus loosely translates to "dew of the sea," given to rosemary because of its affinity for the wind-swept cliffs of the Mediterranean coast, where it originates. Beloved for centuries for its aroma and health benefits, this strongly aromatic member of the mint family is now cultivated worldwide. Greek scholars wore … Continue reading Our Pantry Profile: Rosemary

Our Pantry Profile: Thyme

Thyme {Thymus vulgaris} Common garden thyme has been used for protection, courage, food, and medicine since the beginning of recorded history. A low-growing, aromatic shrub native to the rocky hills of the Mediterranean and Southern Europe, it's now a staple of herb gardens around the world. Roman soldiers bathed in thyme to maintain their courage … Continue reading Our Pantry Profile: Thyme

Food as Medicine: West Indian Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus, Poaceae)

West Indian lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus, Poaceae) is an aromatic tropical perennial with long, slender, light green leaves that grow in groups with bulbous and fibrous stems at the base of the plant.1-3The grass can grow from two to six feet tall, and its leaves are approximately one inch wide with slightly toothed, saw-like margins.2 West Indian … Continue reading Food as Medicine: West Indian Lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus, Poaceae)

Activity of Lemon Balm and Moldavian Dragonhead Essential Oils against Foodborne Microorganisms

It has been postulated that plant essential oils can be used as natural preservatives to delay food spoilage, inhibit pathogen growth, and improve food quality. Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis, Lamiaceae) aerial parts and Moldavian dragonhead (Dracocephalum moldavica, Lamiaceae) aerial parts have antibacterial and antifungal activity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the chemical … Continue reading Activity of Lemon Balm and Moldavian Dragonhead Essential Oils against Foodborne Microorganisms

A Review of the Medicinal Properties of Turmeric with Specific Focus on Curcumin

Turmeric (Curcuma longa, Zingiberaceae) is a perennial plant and the rhizome is used as a culinary spice and medicinally. Turmeric is the major source of curcumin, a polyphenol with numerous health benefits, but poor bioavailability. Turmeric has long been used medicinally and has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticancer, and antimutagenic properties. The purpose of this review was to summarize … Continue reading A Review of the Medicinal Properties of Turmeric with Specific Focus on Curcumin

Linden Sends Soft Sleep

The Herb Society of America Blog

By Beth Schreibman-Gehring, Chairman of Education for The Western Reserve Herb Society unit of The Herb Society of America

6a00d8349ca72c53ef017c36657a78970b-320wiMeet one of my favorite wellness remedies — the flowers and leaves of the lovely linden tree. You may know it by its other names, lime tree or American basswood. It’s an easily identifiable tree with lovely boxy leaves and pretty seed pods. It’s easy to identify when blooming. Just use your ears and nose.  A linden tree may be called a “bee tree” for good reason. Walk under it and look up. If it’s covered with flowers it will undoubtedly be covered with busy, buzzy honeybees. I have been obsessed with its clean yet sweet and floral fragrance. A stand of linden in full bloom is the scent of warmed raw floral honey and freshly mown hay.

In European countries it’s commonly referred to as the linden and in America as…

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Effect of a Natural Turmeric Matrix Formulation on the Absorption and Bioavailability of Curcumin

Curcuminoids are the major bioactive molecules in turmeric (Curcuma longa, Zingiberaceae). They are amphiphilic compounds that are more soluble in organic solvents than aqueous solutions, and their low water solubility translates to poor gastrointestinal absorption. Moreover, the high rate of metabolism and metabolic inactivation and the rapid elimination of curcuminoids results in low serum curcuminoid … Continue reading Effect of a Natural Turmeric Matrix Formulation on the Absorption and Bioavailability of Curcumin

Geographical Variation in Nutritional Content of Baobab

The baobab (Adansonia digitata, Malvaceae) tree is indigenous to sub-Saharan Africa and is an important source of food and economic generation. Leaves, fruit, and seeds are eaten, and timber, fodder, and fibers from the tree are marketed. With roles in traditional medicine, culture, and religions, it is widely considered a sacred tree and often allowed … Continue reading Geographical Variation in Nutritional Content of Baobab